Pay It Forward · Writing

Vampires

** THIS IS A REPOST OF A VERY EARLY BLOG POST **

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When people find out I’ve written a book about vampires, everyone asks if my stories are like Twilight. It gets me a little irritated because not only is the answer ‘no, my vampires don’t sparkle’, but there are so many other vampire stories/movies and shows that came before Twilight, that no-one takes into consideration.

Buffy, Angel, Underworld, Vampire Diaries, Blade, True Blood, the Carpathians, Anita Blake, Interview with a Vampire, Dracula. There are so many more.

To be honest, I never knew Twilight existed until the first film came out and my dad said we should watch it on the TV. The same for Vampire Diaries. I love both the Twilight films and the Vampire Diaries series, but have never read the books and don’t really intend to now. I have never watched or read the Sookie Stackhouse series, Dracula or Interview with a Vampire in any form. When I was a teenager, the only vampires that existed belonged to Buffy the Vampire Slayer. So when I grew up, they were the only books I read on vampires.

Since then, I’ve written multiple stories about vampires, werewolves and witches, but they have nothing to do with the modern day take on vampires. Mine are Buffy, old school. I have certain characters in my series who vaguely resemble those from some of the popular shows but it was never from exposure to them. I have characters like Jasper and Carlisle from Twilight, Angel and Spike from Buffy and Damon and Klaus from Vampire Diaries.

However, my series is not about blood suckers, preying on humans. My stories focus more on the Underworld view; seeing vampires in their natural environment and watching how they interact with other supernatural creatures. If there is biting in my vampire stories, it is more of an unpleasant experience than the main focus. Although it mentions the darker aspects of their community, with humans as play toys and sex things, they are never explored, but considered deplorable. My stories are definitely not of an Anita Blake angle.

Although I want readers from teenage years upwards to be able to read my books, this is not the reason they do not fall into the Anita Blake category. First and foremost, the stories are vampire chronicles, second romances, third action. And when I say romance, I mean of the loved up, Christmas movie, Valentine’s day, red roses kind. A romantic, quiet, understated seduction type of romance, rather than the brash, sexed up, erotica style that seems to be clogging the vampire genre lately.

This doesn’t mean that the brash, obvious style isn’t worth reading, or lowers the tone of the genre, because it doesn’t. It is simply that I wanted my stories to be something different. Something new that showed the darker, lighter and more serious side of the genre. It will be, in no way for everyone. Some will love it, some will hate it and some might not know what to think about it.

All I ask is that if you read Runaway Girl, the first in my vampire series, the Secrets of Avelina Chronicles, and you’re undecided, don’t like it, or find it weak…wait…read the second book and then make up your mind. I always find the first book more difficult because you have to introduce every character from scratch. Once you get to the following books, there’s more room for the story and exploring characters, rather than introducing a whole host of new people.

So read it, enjoy it, hate it, or pass…the beautiful thing about books is that everyone is different and a dozen people can have a dozen different views of the same book. Either way, I’d love it if you wrote a review – good or bad. Honesty is the most important thing for a review; not writing something nice because you like the author but don’t want to disappoint them with a bad review, or writing a bad review of a book you enjoyed because you hate the author. Book reviews shouldn’t be personal to the author, but to the book. If you love it, gush as much as you want. If you hate it, tell me why and I won’t take it personally. No book can be loved by everyone. And that’s a good thing.

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